#design

To All Our Future Flames

To All Our Future Flames will be the final show at Gigantic Gallery as the gallery currently exists. The first strike was a change in building management. The second was an increased rent and additional fees. And the third was an opportunity to open a new, collaborative space in a better location designed to serve multiple purposes. So we’re out.

Credit for the show idea and curation belongs to Jason Edward Davis. We were sitting in the gallery drinking beers, which is our Friday tradition, when he suggested doing a show of work on matchboxes. We hadn’t done that before, and I’m a huge fan of tiny art, and I was dreading the idea of orchestrating another group show right after the second Cartes de visite, so we went with it.

The title came to me in the shower.

And the flyer came to me in a frustrated rush the day before the opening. Jason suggested I make a couple pieces for the show, so I spent much of the month working on those rather than being responsible, desiging a striking flyer and blasting the local alt weeklies with a punny press release. If nobody sends me a preview image of the show, I usually go to The Noun Project for SVGs and try to design something symbolically, hopefully, representative. But they now require an account before downloading. So as I was waiting for the confirmation email, which took forever, I started looking for similar iconography in the fonts on my machine. There’s a curvy heart in the Webdings set. So I took that, flipped it, skewed it, doubled down and colored the parts. Voila:

flaming hearts

And I made two pieces for the show. The first is called The King James in Fire & Flames. Here’s a screenshot:

King James In Fire and Flames

And here’s a screenshot of the script I wrote to make it:

King James In Fire and Flames in Ruby

The script is just a bit of Ruby that will run through the King James Bible line by line, collating each verse, then scanning each verse for the terms you give it (I gave it fire and flame). If the verse contains at least one of your terms, it will wrap the verse and term in HTML (p and span tags) and print it out. You can then pipe the output to a file and write a little stylesheet in CSS to make the output easier to read. You can also give it secondary (“deuterocanonical”) terms, which are wrapped only in verses that contain primary terms. Hence the blue Lords and Gods.

So I printed the output (on six 11” x 17” sheets, 10pt type, no linebreaks) and the source code, rolled and stuffed it in the largest matchbox I could find. Nobody bought it. So it goes.

I also wrote 42 love haiku. Each haiku is in a tiny file of its own on my web server, and each match in the box has one URL written on it. So you go to one of the URLs and you get a lovely little love haiku:

One lovely love haiku

And by the time you read it, the server has already erased the file containing that haiku. Like matches, each URL is single-use. Because love, like a match, flares up and burns out fast. Ha ha! Ha.

This is one of the error messages:

One lovely error message

And this is a pretty accurate summary of how the night progressed:

Jason Edward Davis

Heart full of matches

Glass heart shattered

   Gigantic Gallery   Portland   art   love   design   hearts   King James Bible   haiku   poetry   ruby 

Apple should just get Google to design all their apps.

   apple   google   tech   design   chrome   ios 

And now for another fun round of Find The Article.

People cannot design like this and lament diminishing attention spans and the loss of ability to focus. Design like this actively encourages distraction. And it’s tacky, too.

   design   retardery   distraction 

giganticgallery:

New business cards designed and ordered. Two different designs on the front, one on the back. 

Rad.

Yep. I made them.

It looks even better framed.

It looks even better framed.

Three sketches by Maggie McGowan. 10” x 15”, India ink on watercolor paper.

Part of our current show, The First Look.

Photo by the ever-courageous John Carleton.

Three sketches by Maggie McGowan. 10” x 15”, India ink on watercolor paper.

Part of our current show, The First Look.

Photo by the ever-courageous John Carleton.

Framed sketch by Emily Christensen of Filly Designs. Colored pencil on paper. $45.

Part of our latest show, The First Look.

Photo by the ever-charismatic John Carleton.

Framed sketch by Emily Christensen of Filly Designs. Colored pencil on paper. $45.

Part of our latest show, The First Look.

Photo by the ever-charismatic John Carleton.